Ode to the field of crocuses that made my day

Darling crocus,

You pop up unexpectedly and turn a dull weekday into spring.

First flower, saffron shield, happy herald, brave bulb.

You arrive with far less fanfare than your thirstier cousins, claim your space on the frozen ground, next to piles of dirty snow and creeping ice, and wave those dainty petals with unfettered glee.

Bravo!

Let other flowers preen from crystal vases and hot house bouquets. You’re the natural beauty, asking for little more than sunlight and fresh air.

You offer hope and a welcome reminder that life is both precious and constant. You survived winter and we will too.

The danger among us humans, who move briskly through our days, is that we’ll miss your show entirely, glance up briefly from our phones and mistake you for a small, white wrapper or a piece of plastic blowing in the breeze.

That would be a shame because right now the world needs everything you offer — beauty, optimism and peace.

Yesterday I saw you and you made my day.

Welcome.

Welcome.

Welcome, spring!

Such an unassuming little beauty! My new favorite flower (right along with the lilac). I took this shot yesterday in front of the Lawrence Chapel.
I was driving past, glanced to my right and spotted these unexpected treasures. I could not wait to finish my errands and hustle back to take a picture or two. See all that snow in the background? You have to look closely to find the beauty in early spring, but it’s there.
Later, they opened up even more.
I took this shot last year of the crocuses in front of the Lawrence Chapel. It’s colder for them this year, and there’s still a lot of snow on the ground, but they came back anyway because that’s the way they roll.
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4 thoughts on “Ode to the field of crocuses that made my day

  1. I am currently in Florida, where I’m sure no one has ever felt this way about early spring. This was beautifully written!

  2. Well written! Grew up in Germany where Krokus was a sure sign that Easter was near after 4 plus months of snow on the ground. It served as a symbol of rebirth and decorated the village church appropriately.

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